Details

    • Similar Issues:

      Description

      The

      waitUntil{}

      block increases its wait time every time the condition fails. However, the user may have knowledge about the approximate time for the condition to pass. Jobs could proceed much faster if the user could limit the maximum interval before checking the condition again. Something like:

      waitUntil{<cond>, <maxTime(min)>}

        Attachments

          Issue Links

            Activity

            Hide
            sonneveldsmartward Nick Sonneveld added a comment - - edited

            There's a pull request against this issue https://issues.jenkins-ci.org/browse/JENKINS-34554 . It simply adds a limit.

            Show
            sonneveldsmartward Nick Sonneveld added a comment - - edited There's a pull request against this issue https://issues.jenkins-ci.org/browse/JENKINS-34554 . It simply adds a limit.
            Hide
            sso Simon So added a comment -

            +1

            The wait condition sometimes could take a day to two to turn true, so having an unbounded backoff makes it so that we pretty much can't use waitUtil.

            As a side note, is there another way to pause and continue a pipeline triggered by an external event (like a git merge) without waitUtil?

            Show
            sso Simon So added a comment - +1 The wait condition sometimes could take a day to two to turn true, so having an unbounded backoff makes it so that we pretty much can't use waitUtil. As a side note, is there another way to pause and continue a pipeline triggered by an external event (like a git merge) without waitUtil?
            Hide
            xvdessel Xavier Van Dessel added a comment -

            If the average delay amounts to hours or days, as can be the case for resources, the delay becomes huge (hours), which cannot be justified by overhead cost. Hence, a maximum value makes a lot of sense in these cases.

            Show
            xvdessel Xavier Van Dessel added a comment - If the average delay amounts to hours or days, as can be the case for resources, the delay becomes huge (hours), which cannot be justified by overhead cost. Hence, a maximum value makes a lot of sense in these cases.
            Hide
            jglick Jesse Glick added a comment -

            Well, waitUntil as it stands will at worst waste an amount of time expressible as a fraction/multiple of the actual average delay before the condition stands, because it uses an exponential backoff. If it does scale up to a user-defined maximum, you would get a faster build at the expense of more overhead rechecking the condition.

            Show
            jglick Jesse Glick added a comment - Well, waitUntil as it stands will at worst waste an amount of time expressible as a fraction/multiple of the actual average delay before the condition stands, because it uses an exponential backoff. If it does scale up to a user-defined maximum, you would get a faster build at the expense of more overhead rechecking the condition.

              People

              • Assignee:
                mmitche Matthew Mitchell
                Reporter:
                anshuarya Anshu Arya
              • Votes:
                6 Vote for this issue
                Watchers:
                10 Start watching this issue

                Dates

                • Created:
                  Updated: